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Posts Tagged ‘Suiseki’

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From Wikipedia,

Suiseki (水石?) is the Japanese art of stone appreciation and may also refer to the objects of the appreciation—the stones. Suiseki may take many forms including those that bear a resemblance to human figures, animal figures, landscape forms, and those which are purely abstract.

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In the Leyden papyrus the bloodstone is praised as an amulet in the following extravagant terms:

The world has no greater thing;  if any one have this with him he will be given whatever he asks for;  it also assuages the wrath of kings and despots, and whatever the wearer says will be believed. Whoever bears this stone, which is a gem, and pronounces the name engraved upon it, will find all doors open, while bonds and stone walls will be rent asunder.

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Quoted From THE CURIOUS LORE OF PRECIOUS STONES

Probably the earliest notice of the peculiar superstition in regard to the turquoise–namely, that it preserves the wearer from injury in case of falling–is contain in Vomar’s  thirtheenth century “Steinbuch,” where we read:

Whoever owns the true turquoise set in gold will not injure any of his limbs when he falls, whether he be riding or walking, so long as he has the stone with him.

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Agate is said to have mystical powers to guard one against danger, to cure insomnia, to ensure pleasant dreams.

There is a saying:

Who comes with summer to this earth,

And owes to June her hour of birth,

With ring of agate on her hand,

Can health, long life, and wealth command.

 

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From Wikipedia,

Petrified wood (from the Greek root petro meaning “rock” or “stone”; literally “wood turned into stone”) is the name given to a special type of fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. It is the result of a tree having turned completely into stone by the process of permineralization. All the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (most often a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the wood. Unlike other types of fossils which are typically impressions or compressions, petrified wood is a three dimensional representation of the original organic material. The petrifaction process occurs underground, when wood becomes buried under sediment and is initially preserved due to a lack of oxygen which inhibits aerobic decomposition. Mineral-laden water flowing through the sediment deposits minerals in the plant’s cells and as the plant’s lignin and cellulose decay, a stone mould forms in its place.

In general, wood takes fewer than 100 years to petrify. The organic matter needs to become petrified before it decomposes completely.[1] A forest where the wood has petrified becomes known as a petrified forest.

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